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Copyright Best Practices

Copyright Workflow for FST Posting to Canvas

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Copyright Best Practices for Faculty Posting to Course Site

Before posting materials on your course site, or having them copied for distribution, please consider copyright permissions issues.

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  1. Can you post or copy the material for class without getting prior permission from the copyright holder/publisher?
     Yes, if you can answer “yes” to one of the following questions.
    1. Has license already been conferred from author/publisher/copyright holder?
      1. E.g. Instructor obtained permission, work covered by Creative Commons license, etc.
      2. A copy of the permission grant should be furnished to FST assistant for record-keeping purposes.
    2. Is the material in the public domain?  (e.g. text of court opinions, Federal Gov’t pubs, copyright has expired, etc.)
      1. More on Public Domain: https://www.teachingcopyright.org/handout/public-domain-faq
    3. Is it fair use?
      1. About Fair Use: https://copyright.columbia.edu/basics/fair-use.html
      2. Fair Use Checklist: http://copyright.columbia.edu/copyright/fair-use/fair-use-checklist/
      3. Note: Cambridge Univ. Press v. Georgia State Univ. (11th Cir.) has been remanded to the N.D. Ga. district court for reevaluation of whether posting PDFs of chapters and articles constituted fair use. http://libguides.law.gsu.edu/gsucopyrightcase
      4. If you need assistance making a fair use determination, Stanford’s General Counsel office can help: lks@stanford.edu
    4. Is it subject to another statutory copyright exemption?  (e.g. TEACH Act)
      1. https://scholarworks.duke.edu/copyright-advice/copyright-in-teaching/
  2. Remember, it is always possible to link to material online or in Stanford-accessible databases—without any need for copyright permission.
    1. Cases:  Cases often available online for free.  Also, Lexis & Westlaw offer link-building tools to their formatted versions. 
      1. Lexis:  http://www.lexisnexis.com/tutorials/Link_Builder_for_Lexis_Advance.html
      2. Westlaw: https://lawschool.westlaw.com/admin/wllinkcreator/wllinkcreator.aspx
    2. Academic Articles:  Check first to see whether the article has been posted online with Open Access designation.  Alternatively, Stanford University Libraries may carry journal in its databases, enabling hyperlinking.  Just retrieve the article from a Stanford database and select “view citation” from the article’s record to obtain a stable URL.  If you need assistance finding an article or its permalink, the library can help!
  3. A few (not many) Stanford-accessible databases do allow educators to post entire articles to Canvas —without any need for copyright permission.  Please ask the library about specific databases.
  4. Don’t forget hard copy Course Reserves!  Multiple copies can be placed on Course Reserves at the library for the students to check out – with no copyright issues attached.  Please contact reference@law.stanford.edu to place materials on reserve.

Copyright Workflow for FST Posting to Canvas

Before posting materials on Canvas, please apply the following workflow.

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Step 1: Course Instructor Makes a Decision about the Content to be Posted

Course Instructor must determine whether material (as opposed to just a hyperlink to the material) can be uploaded to Canvas.  To reach that determination, the instructor will consider the following four questions:

  1. Has permission or a license already been conferred from author/publisher/copyright holder?
    1. E.g. Instructor has obtained permission, or work is covered by Creative Commons license
    2. If yes, a copy of the permission grant should be furnished to FST assistant for record-keeping purposes.
  2. Is the material in the public domain?  (e.g. text of court opinions, Federal Gov’t pubs, copyright has expired)
    1. Public Domain FAQ: https://www.teachingcopyright.org/handout/public-domain-faq
  3. Is it fair use?  
    1. About Fair Use: https://copyright.columbia.edu/basics/fair-use.html
    2. Fair Use Checklist: http://copyright.columbia.edu/copyright/fair-use/fair-use-checklist/
    3. If assistance is needed making a fair use determination, Stanford’s General Counsel office can help: lks@stanford.edu; https://library.stanford.edu/using/copyright-reminder
  4. Is use subject to another copyright statutory exemption?  (e.g. TEACH Act, etc.)
    1. https://scholarworks.duke.edu/copyright-advice/copyright-in-teaching/

If the Course Instructor’s answer to any of the above questions is “Yes,” the material, itself, can be uploaded to Canvas.

Step 2: If the Answer to Each Step 1 Question was “No,” FST Must Either:

(a) Post a Link to the Content, Rather than Posting the Content, or

(b) Seek Permission via SIPX to Post the Content.

2(a):  Linking to content

If content is court opinion:

  1. Check Google Scholar, CaseText, or court’s website to find copy of opinion, and copy link
  2. If professor prefers formatting of Westlaw or Lexis, enter case citation into Westlaw or Lexis’ link builder tools

 If content is law journal article:

  1. Google the article to see if a copy has been posted online.  If it has been posted online, copy and paste that link into Canvas.
  2. If it hasn’t been posted online, you can create links to law journal articles using Lexis or Westlaw. (See “FST Guide to Finding Links”)
  3. Alternatively, post a copy of the law journal article retrieved from HeinOnline

If content is non-law journal article:

  1. Google the article to see if a copy has been posted as open-access, online.  If it has been posted online, copy and paste that link into Canvas.
  2. If it hasn’t been posted online, use Searchworks (searchworks.stanford.edu), the University’s library catalog, to find an electronic copy of the journal.
  3. Retrieve the specific article from the library databases and post permalink to Canvas. (See “FST Guide to Finding Links”)

If content is newspaper/blog:

  1. Google the article to see if a copy has been posted online.  If it has been posted online, copy and paste that link into Canvas.
  2. If it hasn’t been posted online, you can create links to news content using Lexis or ProQuest. (See “FST Guide to Finding Links”)

If content is book chapter:

  1. Use Searchworks (searchworks.stanford.edu), the University’s library catalog, to determine whether there is an electronic book version available.  Follow catalog links to the electronic book, and generate a hyperlink to the specific book chapter.
  2. If an electronic book version is not available, you will need to request the chapter via SIPX.

If you have trouble locating links, please contact reference@law.stanford.edu

2(b):  Seeking Permission for Content via SIPX

Log in to course site on Canvas and click “SIPX.”  Fill out SIPX form with citation information about the journal, article, or chapter for which permission is sought.

If you need assistance with SIPX, please contact albah@law.stanford.edu

 

FST Guide to Finding Links 

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I.  How to Find Links to Cases

  1. Check free, online sources for the text of the opinion [e.g. Google Scholar (scholar.google.com), CaseText (casetext.com), Justia (justia.com)] by entering the opinion’s citation.  Copy hyperlink once opinion is retrieved.
  2. If the Instructor prefers Westlaw or Lexis formatting for the opinion, you can create links to the case on Lexis/Westlaw using their link-builder tools.
  1. To create a link on Lexis:
    1. Go to http://www.lexisnexis.com/tutorials/Link_Builder_for_Lexis_Advance.html
    2. Enter the journal article’s citation (e.g. 285 F.3d 216)
    3. Copy & paste link into Canvas
  2. To create a link on Westlaw:
    1. Go to https://lawschool.westlaw.com/admin/wllinkcreator/wllinkcreator.aspx
    2. Enter the journal article’s citation (e.g. 285 F.3d 216) in the “Link to a Specific Document” bar
    3. Copy & paste link into Canvas

II.  How to Find Links to Law Journal Articles

  1. Google the article to see if a copy has been posted online.  If it has been posted online, copy and paste that link into Canvas.
  2. If it hasn’t been posted online, you can create links to law journal articles using Lexis or Westlaw.
    1. To create a link on Lexis:
      1. Go to http://www.lexisnexis.com/tutorials/Link_Builder_for_Lexis_Advance.html
      2. Enter the journal article’s citation (e.g. 53 Duke L.J. 1067
      3. Copy & paste link into Canvas
    2. To create a link on Westlaw:
      1. Go to https://lawschool.westlaw.com/admin/wllinkcreator/wllinkcreator.aspx
      2. Enter the journal article’s citation (e.g. 53 Duke L.J. 1067) in the “Link to a Specific Document” bar
      3. Copy & paste link into Canvas
  3. NOTE:  HeinOnline has provided express permission for SLS to post a PDF copy of, rather than a hyperlink to, law journal articles downloaded from on HeinOnline.  This is an alternative to using links to Lexis & Westlaw.  However, because of HeinOnline’s search interface, it is a bit more difficult to retrieve a law journal article from HeinOnline.
    1. From on-campus, go to heinonline.org. 
    2. Click “Log In.”  There is no password; clicking the “Log In” button is enough.
    3. Click the “Citation” tab and enter the article’s citation (e.g. 53 Duke L.J. 1067)
    4. Retrieve and download the article.  Upload the PDF to Canvas.

III. How to Find links to Non-Law Journal Articles

  1. Google the article to see if a copy has been posted as open-access, online.  If it has been posted online, copy and paste that link into Canvas.
     

  2. If it hasn’t been posted online, open Searchworks (searchworks.stanford.edu), the University’s library catalog.
     

  3. Click the “All Fields” button and choose “Title.”  Then enter the title of the journal (not the title of the article).

  4. Look for the catalog record that is designated “Electronic Resource”—i.e. bearing an electronic copy of that journal.

     

     

  5. Click “Find Full Text” and enter year/volume/date prompts to enter the database (e.g. ProQuest, Ebsco, JSTOR) that carries the journal.

     

  6. Retrieve the record for the specific article you’re interested in from that database (e.g. ProQuest, Ebsco, JSTOR).

     

  7. Click the “Permalink” or “Cite” buttons to generate a stable URL for the article. 

    Ebsco Sample
    ProQuest Sample

     
  8. Copy & paste the URL into Canvas.

IV. How to Find Links to Electronic Versions of Books (eBooks)

  1. Open Searchworks (searchworks.stanford.edu), the University’s library catalog.
  2. Click the “All Fields” button and choose “Title.”  Then enter the title of the book.
  3. Look for a catalog record that indicates online access.  If you do not find one, this means Stanford does not have access to an electronic version of the book.
  4. Click the link next to the “Online” (green) button to access the electronic version of the book. 
    1. There could be several online platforms that host the book.  If the particular platform hosting your book is eBrary, when you click the eBrary link, you will need to create an eBrary account (very simple).
    2. Once logged in to eBrary, click the chapter that has been assigned.
    3. Once at the chapter, click the hyperlink symbol at the top of the screen to generate a permalink to the chapter.
  5. Copy & paste the URL into Canvas.

V. How to Find Links to News Articles

  1. Google the article to see if a copy has been posted online.  If it has been posted online, copy and paste that link into Canvas.
  2. If it is online but behind a pay-wall (e.g. certain NYT or Wall Street Journal articles), open either ProQuest (choose ProQuest Databases from EZ Proxy page) or log in to your Lexis account (lawschool.lexis.com).
    1. Search for the article on ProQuest or Lexis.
    2. Copy or build hyperlink using methods described above in II(7) and I(2), respectively. 
      ProQuest Example
      Lexis Example

       

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